World Population Clock

No one could ever count all the people who are born or die every day. The climbing numbers of the world population clock in the MATHEMATICS ADVENTURE LAND are based on the calculations of the U.S. Population Reference Bureau (PRB), which has been determining data on the development of the population and the health of people worldwide since 1929 and making them available to the public.

According to this, the increase in humanity is currently 83,276,563 people per year. This corresponds to 228,155 people every day or 158 people every minute or 2.6 people every second.

According to the DSW data report of the “German Foundation for World Population” of September 2014 — they correspond to the data of the Population Reference Bureau — the world population amounted to 7238 million people (about 7.2 billion).

The following figures were determined for the 5 continents:

Asia (with Turkey)4351 million60,1%
Africa (with Egypt)1136 million15,7%
America971 million13,4%
Europe (with Russia)741 million10,3%
Oceania (with Australia)39 million0,5%

For the 16 most populous countries in the world, the balance is as follows:

1.People’s Republic of China1372 million19,0% of the world population
2.India1296 million17,9%…
3.United States321 million4,5%…
4.Indonesia252 million3,5%…
5.Brazil203 million2,8%…
6.Pakistan194 million2,7%…
7.Nigeria178 million2,5%…
8.Bangladesh159 million2,2%…
9.Russia144 million2,0%…
10.Japan127 million1,8%…
11.Mexico120 million1,7%…
12.Philippines100 million1,4%…
13.Ethiopia96 million1,3%…
14.Vietnam91 million1,2%…
15.Egypt88 million1,2%…
16.Germany81 million1,1%…

These 16 most populous states are home to 4,822 million people, or about two-thirds of the world’s total population.


History

For the year zero, the world population is estimated at 300 million people.

By 1650, immediately after the end of the Thirty Years’ War in Europe (1618–1648), the number had risen to 500 million.

By 1900, at the end of the Industrial Revolution, it was 1,600 million.

In 1965, 20 years after World War II and after the independence of most former colonies, the world population had already grown to 3,300 million.

In 1980, at the height of the Cold War, it reached 4,430 million, and in 1990, at the end of the confrontation, 5,250 million.

In 2000, the number of people exceeded 6,000 million (i.e., six billion). This corresponded to a twenty-fold increase in the world’s population in two millennia.

Since the year 1700, the following growth curve emerges, which even shows a more than exponential growth in the 20th century:


And this … awaits us:

In October 2010, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA — formerly the United Nations Fund for Population Activities) announced:

World Population at 9.1 Billion in 2050.

Geneva — The world population of 6.8 billion today will grow to 9.15 billion by 2050, according to United Nations projections. Accordingly, Europe will be the only continent in which the population will decline over the next four decades. If today (2010!) 732 million people live in Europe between the North Cape and Gibraltar, according to UN calculations there will only be 691 million men, women and children in 2050. Above all, the low birth rate in countries such as Germany will lead to shrinkage, it said. Asia will remain the most populous continent in 2050, with around 5.2 billion people. Today (2010!), UN experts count around 4.1 billion Asians. According to the UNFPA, Africa’s population will double from around one billion today (2010!) to almost two billion in 40 years.


Literature

[1] Deutsche Stiftung Weltbevölkerung (DSW): DSV-Datenreport Weltbevölkerung 2014.

[2] Kernig, C.D.: Und mehret euch? Deutschland und die Weltbevölkerung im 21. Jahrhundert, Bonn, 2006.